Is There Really Wrist Snap On The Serve - How To Play Tennis With Excellent Technique- Tennis Technique

Is There Really Wrist Snap On The Serve

For many moons I have heard the term "snap your wrist" on the serve. I don't recall being told this by a coach as a youngster but have certainly heard many a pro player mention "wrist snap" when describing how they get pop on their serve. 

You might have heard others say that one should NOT snap their wrist on the serve and that wrist snap should rather be a passive action that is produced by the larger muscle groups about the arm. This can lead to confusion for those of you who desire to learn and achieve a more powerful serve.

I think it is important for us as enthusiastic practitioners to try and understand what the top players in the world are actually trying to say with their terminology. Words are very powerful and it should be the "meaning" of the "feeling" that we should try and seek to understand from their words. What is it then exactly that they are trying to convey? This instructional will try to provide this answer in a clear and simple manner.

I played many sports growing up and one sport in particular that I was adamantly taught to "snap my wrist" on was basketball. One my high school coaches taught the technique as such: Set your feet, extend your arm toward the basket and "snap your wrist" through the shot. I did so and it worked well...even made all county :-).

As you can see in the above image of the world's leading 3 point basketball shooter... the last image in the sequence illustrates what most would seem to visually equate "wrist snap" with...I know I did.

​It's that unforgettable follow through with the extended arm and arced wrist bent at the hand. This is the standard trademark ending for basketball players when they have just made a shot from downtown...of which they seem to then pose for what seems like an hour so that all the world can acknowledge...yes it was me that just made that glorious shot...Now that I reflect...I think I might have been a bit guilty of that pleasure as well once in a while...especially on a big basket :-).

However, the truth of the matter is that wrist snap, as we know it in basketball, is not the same as when a top pro player speaks of wrist snap...there are indeed some commonalities but also some very different distinctions...

Click the button below to check out my short tennis instructional video to once and forever more understand exactly how to properly use your wrist on the serve in order to get more power...over 30% more serve power is at stake if you choose to skip watching this video! If you have an 80mph serve a 30% increase is 104mph. How cool would that be?!

More...

Today's Serve Instructional Key Terms 

Wrist Flexion:

Flexion refers to a movement that decreases the angle between two body parts and in this case the body parts are the hand and wrist...bending the palm down towards the wrist.

Wrist Extension:

Extension refers to a movement that increases the angle between two body parts and in this case the body parts are the hand and wrist...bending the palm away from the wrist.

Radial Deviation (flexion):

​Movement of the wrist toward the thumb side of the forearm.

Ulnar Deviation (flexion):

Movement of the wrist toward the little finger side of the forearm.


Pronation:

​The rotation of the forearm so that the palm of the hand faces downwards.

Supination:

​The rotation of the forearm so that the palm of the hand faces upwards.





What do you think? I'd love to hear your thoughts and questions in the comments section below.

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References:

1. Elliott B. Biomechanics and tennis. Br J Sports Med. 2006;40(5):392-396. doi:10.1136/bjsm.2005.023150.

2. Bruce C. Elliott, Robert N. Marshall, and Guillermo J. Noffal Journal of Applied Biomechanics 1995 11:4, 433-442

Contributions of Upper Limb Segment Rotations during the Power Serve in Tennis
Freetester Freetester

My name is Heath Waters. I am a family man first with a beautiful wife and two children who are my world. I happen to also be a registered ATP and WTA professional tour coach who loves empowering coaches and players with real world actionable information. I write this blog in hopes to help grow your love of this great sport. If I can make your tennis journey even a little bit more enjoyable then I have accomplished my goal. Thanks for stopping by.

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